Politico: Donald Trump Will Close DACA Amnesty

President Donald Trump has decided to formally end President Barack Obama’s legally troubled “DACA” amnesty for 800,000  younger illegal immigrants, according to Politico.

The leak to Politico came from two officials, according to the Politico article.

President Donald Trump has decided to end the Obama-era program that grants work permits to undocumented immigrants who arrived in the country as children, according to two sources familiar with his thinking.

Trump’s decision will anger business interests, progressives, and the establishment media sector, and some business-friendly GOP leaders, such as House Speaker Paul Ryan. But the decision likely will be broadly popular among the majority of Americans.

Many polls show that Americans sympathize with the illegals, but also strongly prefer that immigration laws be used to ensure that Americans workers are not disadvantaged by the corporate hiring of cheap illegal migrants.

Trump is expected to combine his Tuesday announcement of the program’s demise with a call for Congress to pass pro-American immigration reform, such as the popular  Raise Actmerit immigration bill.

According to Politico:

In a nod to reservations held by many lawmakers, the White House plans to delay the enforcement of the president’s decision for six months, giving Congress a window to act, according to one White House official. But a senior White House aide said that chief of staff John Kelly, who has been running the West Wing policy process on the issue, “thinks Congress should’ve gotten its act together a lot longer ago.”

Read the article here.

The immigration reform debate is expected to stretch far into the 2018 election year, partly because many other issues clog up Congress’ near-term calendar. Also, Democrats and business groups oppose any reduction in the annual legal inflow of roughly 850,000 low-skill, low-wage workers.

Trump’s pending Raise Act reform would trim the inflow of lower-skilled immigrants who are now being brought into the country via “chain migration” family reunification rules. That reform would likely save $1 trillion in long-term aid, education, retirement, and welfare spending for every decade the inflow is halved, according to a recent estimate. That reduced taxpayer spending translates into lower revenue forecasts for business interests.

The Trump reform would also help many Americans and their children find better jobs at higher wages, business groups admit.

Since 2012, the DACA amnesty has provided work permits to roughly 800,000 illegal immigrants, including many who arrived in the 1990s. Their ages range from 15 to the mid-30s. Establishment media outlets describe the illegals as “children” or “kids,” but their average age is roughly 25. DACA supporters depict the migrants as productive and well-educated, but the available data shows the illegals’ skills are relatively low.

The decision to end DACA was driven by several factors. They included Trump’s campaign trail promise to close down the amnesty, and the broad consensus among legal experts — including Attorney General Jeff Sessions — that Obama’s Oval Office offer of work-permit to illegal violates the constitutional separation of powers. Also, a group of nine Attorneys General

Also, a group of nine Attorneys General is slated to file a lawsuit against the program on September 5.

Each year, four million young Americans turn 18 and beginning looking for well-paying jobs.

Each year, the government provide Green Cards to roughly 1 million legal immigrants. It also hands out almost 3 million short-term work permits to foreign workers. These permits include roughly 330,000 one-year OPT permits for foreign graduates of U.S. colleges, roughly 200,000 three-year H-1B visas for foreign white-collar professionals, and 400,000 two-year permits to DACA illegals.

The current annual flood of foreign labor spikes profits and Wall Street values by cutting salaries for manual and skilled labor offered by blue-collar and white-collar employees. It also drives up real estate priceswidens wealth-gaps, reduces high-tech investment, increases state and local tax burdens, hurts kids’ schools and college education, pushes Americans away from high-tech careers, and sidelines at least 5 million marginalized Americans and their families.

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